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Setting up a Watermelon Garden

RECIPES

A watermelon website just would not be complete without some delicious, mouth-watering watermelon recipes. Here you’ll find dozens of recipes that will be a treat to your pallet, and improve your health.

No more throwing away the rind of your watermelons. High in Citrulline, watermelon rinds can be turned into tasty and healthy salads, desserts, soups, sauces, and cakes.

ENJOY!

Monday
May302011

Watermelon Toner for Oily Skin

You know what day today is.  You've been looking forward to it all week.  Nothing is going to stand in your way tonight.


Watermelons could just be nature's perfect skin care product. It is high in beta-carotene, water, antioxidants as well as a vitamins A, B6, and C, potassium, iron, calcium, and fiber. The seeds contain selenium, essential omega 6 and omega 9 fatty acids, zinc, and vitamin C all of which help fight free radical damage and aging. Watermelon is loaded with citrulline, an amino acid credited with helping skin's healing and regenerative processes. It also contains lycopene, which packs twice the punch of the better known beta-carotene which protects skin from sun damage. Watermelons are high in glutathione, which helps cleanse food of the hazards of oxidized fat. 

 

 


 

 

Ingredients

  • 2 T fresh watermelon juice
  • 1 T vodka
  • 2 T watch hazel
  • 2 T distilled water

 


 


 

 

Directions


  1. Strain the watermelon juice to get rid of seeds and pulp. Combine all ingredients in a small bowl and stir well. Pour into a clean container with a tight-fitting lid. Apply to face with a cotton swab or round.
  2. To use: Pour a small amount on a clean cotton pad and apply it to your face. Store in your refrigerator between uses to retain freshness.  The toner will keep approximately one week.

 

 

Only make as much as you need for one treatment, unless otherwise instructed. These recipes do not contain chemicals to prevent the natural ingredients from souring.

Sunday
May292011

Watermelon Sorbet with Chocolate Seeds

Yield: Makes about 4 to 6 slices, serving 4 generously

Because watermelons vary in size and shape, your yield from the following recipe may differ from ours. We began with a fourth of a large watermelon. When slicing the watermelon, aim for a minimum of four slices but be aware that you could have as many as six, depending on the configuration of your melon; a long, narrow watermelon will give more slices than a fatter, rounded one.



Ingredients


  • a 3 1/2-to 4-pound piece of watermelon (about a quarter of a large watermelon that has been halved lengthwise and crosswise)
  • 1 1/2 ounces fine-quality bittersweet chocolate (not unsweetened), chopped
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1/4 cup fresh lime juice
  • 2 tablespoons Sambuca or other anise-flavored liqueur if desired




Directions

  1. Cut watermelon into 1-inch-thick semi-circular slices and chop flesh coarse, reserving rind.
  2. Arrange reserved watermelon rind slices on their sides on foil-lined baking sheets and cover tightly with plastic wrap. Freeze rinds until frozen hard, about 2 hours.
  3. Line another baking sheet or a tray with parchment or wax paper. In a small bowl set over a small saucepan of barely simmering water melt chocolate and remove from heat. Transfer chocolate to a small resealable bag and seal bag. Snip off tip of one corner of bag to form a tiny hole and onto prepared baking sheet or tray pipe and spread chocolate into 1/3- to 1/2-inch ovals to resemble watermelon seeds. Freeze chocolate "seeds" on baking sheet until very firm, about 30 minutes. Working quickly, peel "seeds" from paper into another small bowl and keep frozen.
  4. Discard real seeds from watermelon to yield 5 cups. In a saucepan heat 1 cup purée with sugar over moderate heat, stirring, until sugar is dissolved and stir into remaining purée with lime juice and liqueur. Chill mixture, covered, until cold.
  5. Freeze sorbet in an ice-cream maker. When sorbet is frozen to a thick slush add three fourths of chocolate "seeds" and continue to freeze until frozen.
  6. Working quickly, fill frozen watermelon rinds with sorbet, smoothing it with a rubber spatula. Arrange remaining chocolate "seeds" realistically on slices and smooth sorbet again. Cover sorbet with plastic wrap and freeze until very firm, about 6 hours. (Watermelon sorbet slices may be made 3 days ahead and kept frozen, wrapped tightly).

Sunday
May292011

Watermelon, Lemonade, and Blueberry Ice Pops

Yield: Makes 8 

Begin making these frozen treats at least one day before serving.



Ingredients


Watermelon ice

 

  • 2 1/2 cups 1/2-inch cubes seeded watermelon (from 2-pound piece)
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 8 5-ounce disposable paper cups
  • 8 ice pop sticks or wooden coffee stirrers

 


Lemon ice

 

  • 1/2 cup water
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 1/2 cup fresh lemon juice
  • 1/4 cup orange juice
  • 1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract

 


Blueberry ice

 

  • 2 cups fresh blueberries (from three 1/2-pint containers)
  • 1 cup water
  • 5 tablespoons sugar
  • 1 teaspoon fresh lemon juice

 




 

Directions

For watermelon ice:

  1. Blend watermelon and sugar in processor until smooth. Strain puree into bowl, pressing on solids to extract as much fruit as possible.
  2. Place cups in shallow baking pan. Spoon watermelon puree into cups, dividing equally (scant 3 tablespoons each). Freeze until mixture is almost frozen, about 2 hours. Cover cups with rounds of foil, sealing tightly at edges. Using tip of small knife, make 1/4-inch slit in center of each foil cover. Push ice pop stick through slit and securely into watermelon ice without hitting bottom of cup. Freeze until watermelon ice is solid, about 1 hour longer.

For lemon ice:

  1. Bring 1/2 cup water and sugar to boil in heavy small saucepan over medium-high heat, stirring until sugar dissolves. Remove from heat. Mix in lemon juice, orange juice, and vanilla. Cool to room temperature.
  2. Place pan with frozen pops on work surface; carefully fold back foil over each cup without dislodging stick. Spoon lemonade into cups, dividing equally (scant 3 tablespoons each). Reseal foil. Freeze until lemonade layer is solid, about 2 hours.

For blueberry ice:

  1. Stir blueberries, 1 cup water, and sugar in heavy medium saucepan over medium-high heat until sugar dissolves. Boil until berries are very soft, stirring occasionally, about 5 minutes. Strain mixture into small bowl, pressing on solids to extract as much fruit as possible. Mix in lemon juice. Cool to room temperature.
  2. Place pan with frozen pops on work surface; carefully fold back foil over each cup without dislodging stick. Spoon blueberry mixture into cups, dividing equally (generous 3 tablespoons each). Reseal foil. Freeze until pops are frozen solid, about 8 hours. (Can be made 2 days ahead. Keep frozen.)
  3. Remove foil, then tear or use scissors to cut cup off each pop; return ice pops to pan and freeze until ready to serve.